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Data Products and Tools Available for Public Download

The open sharing of all TES-SFA data and model products and tools among researchers, the broader scientific community, and the public is critical to advancing the mission of DOE’s Program of Terrestrial Ecosystem Science.

ORNL TES-SFA Data Policy - Data Policy and Fair-Use Statement

Download the SPRUCE Data Management Plan as an example of the planning needed to start research data collection.

Data Product Contents

Belowground respiration, root traits, and soil characteristics of an East Tennessee deciduous forest, 2019-2020

This dataset contains empirical physiological, morphological, and chemical data of root systems, and elemental, nutrient content for soils collected on forty individuals of eight temperate tree species, between June 2019 and July 2020 at The University of Tennessee Forest Research Center and Arboretum in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The project used a novel methodology to empirically derive estimates of the autotrophic and heterotrophic components of soil respiration in-situ. The project consists of two measurement approaches. The first set of measurements uses a standard approach for measuring specific root respiration on excised root systems. The second used “in-situ root trays”
This dataset includes 10 data files in comma separated (*.csv) ASCII format. Data include measurements of leaf and root functional traits for excised root systems and for living root systems housed within in-situ root trays, data on soil carbon and nitrogen pools, in-situ measurements of soil moisture and temperature, data on soil respiration rates for in-situ root trays (both as soil mass-based fluxes, and soil-area based fluxes), and data on the geographic coordinates and tree sizes of study trees. Forty study trees of eight temperate tree species were studied (five individuals per species). Two in-situ root trays were installed per species, each housing one entire root system comprising <3 root orders, and still being attached to the tree via transportive root.
All respiration measurements were conducted with the Li-6800 portable photosynthesis system (Li-COR, Lincoln, NE, USA). Root respiration measurements of excised root tissues were made using the Li-6800 and the Walz 3010-GWK1 gas exchange chamber (Heinz Walz GmbH, Effeltrich, Germany). Root scan images were analyzed using WinRHIZO. These images are companion files to this dataset and are contained in two compressed (*.zip) folders.

Citation:

Hogan, J.A., J.L. Labbé, A.A. Carell, J. Franklin, K.P. Hoyt, O.J. Valverde-Barrantes, C. Baraloto & J.M. Warren. 2022. Belowground respiration, root traits, and soil characteristics of an East Tennessee deciduous forest, 2019-2020. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TES SFA, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. https://doi.org/10.25581/ornlsfa.025/1838660.

User's GuideGuide for Belowground respiration, root traits, and soil characteristics

Data Files*: Download Belowground respiration, root traits, and soil characteristics files (one .zip file) 

* WinRHIZO images are currently available by request, please contact rugglesta@ornl.gov or velliquettet@ornl.gov. 

MOFLUX Intensified Soil Moisture Extremes Decrease Soil Organic Carbon Decomposition: Modeling Archive

This Modeling Archive is in support of a TES-SFA publication “Intensified Soil Moisture Extremes Decrease Soil Organic Carbon Decomposition: A Mechanistic Modeling Analysis” (Liang et al., 2021).

Here we provide model code, inputs, outputs and evaluation datasets for the Microbial ENzyme Decomposition (MEND) model for the Missouri Ozarks AmeriFlux eddy covariance measurement site (MOFLUX) near Ashland, Missouri USA. The MEND model was developed with explicit representation of microbial and enzyme pools to mechanistically simulate the role of microbial organisms and extracellular enzymes in soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition.

 

User's Guide: Open Model Archive User's Guide

Data Files: Download Modeling Archive files (one .zip file)


MAAT Modeling Archive

Biological Mechanisms May Contribute to Soil Carbon Saturation Patterns: Modeling Archive

This Modeling Archive is in support of the TES-SFA publication: Craig ME, Mayes MA, Sulman BN, Walker AP. Biological mechanisms may contribute to soil carbon saturation patterns. Global Change Biology.

Investigators ran and evaluated a multi-assumption soil organic carbon (SOC) model to investigate whether alternative assumptions regarding constraints on soil microbial biomass could lead to soil carbon saturation patterns. We developed this model in the Multi-Assumption Architecture and Testbed (MAAT, https://github.com/walkeranthonyp/MAAT, tag: v1.2.1_Craig2021).

Using MAAT, we embedded three alternative hypotheses in a microbially explicit three-pool SOC model: 1) the efficiency of mineral-associated SOC formation decreases as mineral-associated SOC approaches a maximum value (“Mineral saturation”), 2) the microbial biomass turnover rate increases with increasing microbial biomass (“Density-dependent turnover”), and 3) community carbon use efficiency decreases as microbial biomass increases toward an upper limit (“Density-dependent growth”). We ran a factorial combination of these hypotheses resulting in eight models for three different classes of model (linear decay, Michaelis-Menten decay, or reverse Michaelis-Menten decay), resulting in 24 models, 12 of which are presented or discussed in the related publication.

This archive contains output from three MAAT simulations, and scripts to run these simulations and process and plot the data.

Data Files: Download Data File (one *.zip file 15 model archive files)

User's Guide: Open Modeling Archive User's Guide


MAAT Data Compilation

++++ Microbial Biomass in Soils Receiving Varying Levels of Organic Inputs - A Data Compilation

This dataset contains soil microbial biomass data compiled from published laboratory studies and field manipulations of organic inputs to soils. Each study included at least three levels of a given type of organic input applied to a given type of soil. Studies were selected from the literature that had experimentally manipulated organic input rates to soils using unburned, non-synthetic material (e.g. plant litters, manures, and composts). Fifty-five (55) studies, conducted from 1997 to October 2019, were chosen and compiled into a dataset with 358 observations from 96 combinations of a given organic material applied to a given soil in agricultural systems, laboratory incubations, forests, or grasslands.

User's Guide: Open Data User's Guide

Data Files: Download Data Files (two *.csv files and an R file in one *.zip file)

The third version of FRED is now available! And it has a new look. FRED 3.0 has been encoded into database form and we have developed a Searchable Interface that will allow root ecologists to filter the observations in FRED according to their scientific needs. Obtain access to the Interface through the FRED website (https://roots.ornl.gov/public-release). Prior to downloading data, please read and follow the Data Use Guidelines (https://roots.ornl.gov/guidelines), and it's worth checking out the tips for using FRED (https://roots.ornl.gov/tips) before you begin your analyses.

FRED 3.0 has more than 150,000 observations of more than 330 root traits, with data collected from more than 1400 data sources. FRED 3.0 has 45% more root trait observations than FRED 2.0, particularly in the categories of root anatomy, morphology, and microbial associations. Ancillary data on associated site, vegetation, edaphic, and climatic conditions from across the globe have also increased concurrently with root trait observations.

Physiological Responses of Populus trichocarpa to Warming - Root Function

This data set contains empirical physiological, morphological, and chemical data collected over time on Western Black Cottonwood (Populs trichocarpa Torr. & A.Gray ex Hook., Salicaceae) clones, between July and December 2019 at Oak Ridge National Lab. The project was designed to experimentally warm P. trichocarpa clones and assess their physiological acclimation of leaves versus roots. Ninety genetically identical clones were planted into specially constructed mesocosm growth boxes and grown  at three temperature treatments. The daytime air temperatures of treatments were approximately 25°C, 29°C, and 33°C.  Measurements on plant physiology and growth were conducted at various intervals throughout the experiment.  Two data files were updated on July 7, 2020. Users please download new files.

User's Guide:Open Data User's Guide

Data Files: Download Data File (one *.zip file with 9 *.csv files)

Soil Respiration and Microbial Biomass from Soil Incubations with 13C Labeled Additions

This data set provides the respiration and soil microbial biomass data from a series of short and long-term laboratory incubation experiments with 13C labeled substrates to examine how plant communities (forest vs. grassland), edaphic properties, and microbial communities influence C cycling and the long-term fate of C in soil systems. Paired forest and grassland soils from four locations were incubated with 13C labeled glucose in a short-term (144 hours) study while 13C labeled cellulose was added to soils used in the long-term (729 days) study. Soil respiration, microbial biomass, and soil 13C values were monitored throughout the study.

User's Guide: Open Data User's Guide

Data Files: Download Soil Respiration and Microbial Biomass Data (one .csv file)


Organic Carbon Sorption and Decomposition in Selected Global Soils

This data set reports the results of lab-scale experiments conducted to investigate the dynamics of organic carbon (C) decomposition from several soils from temperate, tropical, arctic, and sub-arctic environments. Results were used to test the newly developed soil microbe decomposition carbon model -- Microbial-ENzyme-mediated Decomposition (MEND). There are 25 *.csv data files included in this data set, a Data Dictionary, and two of the resulting published articles.

User's Guide:Open Data User's Guide

Data Dictionary: Open Data Dictionary

Data Files: Download Data Files (25 files in one *.zip file)

Published papers describing laboratory experiments and development of MEND model parameters, respectively: Jagadamma et al., 2014 and Wang et al., 2013

Walker Branch Watershed -- Griffiths and Johnson, 2018

Effect of Dual Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions on Nutrient Uptake and Saturation Kinetics

Dataset reports the results of field experiments investigating the effect of dual nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) additions on nutrient uptake and saturation kinetics in the West Fork of Walker Branch, a headwater stream on the Oak Ridge Reservation in east Tennessee.

User's Guide: Open Data User's Guide

Data Files: Download Data Files (five *.csv files in one *.zip file)

Published paper describing nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) additions on nutrient uptake and saturation kinetics: Griffiths and Johnson, 2018

Griffiths, N.A., and L.T. Johnson. 2018. Influence of dual nitrogen and phosphorus additions on nutrient uptake and saturation kinetics in a forested headwater stream. Freshwater Science 37:810-825. https://doi.org/10.1086/700700


Walker Branch Watershed -- Recent Observations

++++ Temperature Response of Organic-Matter Decomposition in a Headwater Stream

This data set reports the results of a field study investigating the effect of temperature on organic-matter decomposition in the West Fork of Walker Branch, a headwater stream on the Oak Ridge Reservation in east Tennessee.

User's Guide: Open Data User's Guide

Data Files: Download Data Files (six *.csv files in one *.zip file)

Published paper describing effect of temperature on organic-matter decomposition in a headwater stream: Griffiths and Tiegs, 2016

Griffiths, N.A., and S. D. Tiegs. 2016. Organic-matter decomposition along a temperature gradient in a forested headwater stream. Freshwater Science 2016 35:2, 518-533. https://doi.org/10.1086/685657

Daily Climate and Soil Temperature Data

This data set reports daily climate and soil temperature data for Walker Branch Watershed. As part of the long-term Walker Branch project, daily climate and soil temperature data were collected using instruments on a meteorological tower located in an upper slope of the watershed. This data set contains one data file (*.csv) of daily climate and soil temperature data from 1993 through 2010.

User's Guide: Open Data User's Guide

Data Files: Download Climate and Soil Temperature Data


15-minute and Daily Stream Discharge and Annual Runoff

This data set reports 15-minute and daily stream discharge, and annual runoff for the West and East Forks draining Walker Branch Watershed (WBW). The long-term Walker Branch Hydrology Monitoring project was intended to document changes in the water balance (precipitation inputs, stream discharge outputs) for the WBW over time. This data set contains three data files (*.csv) of stream discharge (L/s) for 15-minute and daily intervals, and annual runoff (cm). The daily and annual data sets began in 1969 in both East and West Forks, while the 15-minute data sets began in 1994 in both Forks. Data were collected through 2014 for the West Fork, and through 2012 for the East Fork.

User's Guide: Open Data User's Guide

Data Files:


Hourly, Daily, and Annual Precipitation

This data set reports hourly, daily, and annual precipitation in Walker Branch Watershed (WBW). The long-term Walker Branch Hydrology Monitoring project was intended to document changes in the water balance (precipitation inputs, stream discharge outputs) for the WBW over time. This data set contains three data files (*.csv) of precipitation amount for hourly, monthly, and annual intervals for the years 1969 through 2012. Five rain gauges were used from 1969-1979, and two rain gauges were used from 1980-2012.

User's Guide: Open Data User's Guide

Data Files:


Weekly Stream Water Chemistry

This data set reports weekly stream water chemistry in the West and East Forks of Walker Branch Watershed (WBW). The long-term Walker Branch stream chemistry monitoring is intended to provide data on watershed output of chemicals via streamflow and long-term changes in stream chemical composition. This data set contains two data files (*.csv) of stream water chemistry collected at weekly time intervals from 1989 through 2013.

User's Guide: Open Data User's Guide

Data Files:


Walker Branch Watershed – Long-Term Hydrology, Stream Ecology, Forest Characterization, and Biogeochemistry Data

Walker Branch watershed has been the site of long-term, intensive environmental studies since the late-1960's by staff from the Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, staff from the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division, Air Resources Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and many visiting university researchers.

Access additional Walker Branch Watershed historical site information at ORNL Website

Litter Production of Oak-Hickory Forest at Missouri Ozark (MOFLUX) Site: 2003-2015

Litter production has been measured at the second-growth upland oak-hickory forest at the Missouri Ozark AmeriFlux (MOFLUX) site. The MOFLUX site is located in the University of Missouri Baskett Wildlife Research area (BWREA), situated in the Ozark Border Region of central Missouri, USA, and is part of the AmeriFlux network (site ID: US-MOz). During 2003, 24 circular vegetation plots (each 0.08 ha) were established in the MOFLUX forest. The plots were situated 50 m apart on 5 linear transects radiating out from the flux tower base in SE, S, SW, W and NW directions—there were 5 plots per transect except for the NW one, which had only 4 due to the presence of a small pond at the terminus. Litter measurements were initiated in October 2003 and continue to the present. Data through 2015 are reported in this current dataset.

User's Guide:Open Data User's Guide

Data Files: Download Data File


Eddy Flux and Meteorology over Deciduous Forest, Prairie, and Soybean Ecosystems in Missouri, USA, during the Total Solar Eclipse of 2017

Eddy fluxes and meteorology data are reported at high temporal resolution for three flux tower sites in Mid-Missouri before, during, and after the Total Solar Eclipse of August 21, 2017. Mid-Missouri experienced up to 2 minutes and 40 seconds of totality at around solar noon during the eclipse. The sites are located in deciduous oak-hickory forest, native prairie, and soybean ecosystems. Eddy fluxes were computed using a wavelet-based approach that permitted the calculation of two-minute mean fluxes without losing low frequency flux contributions. During the eclipse, standard meteorological variables were sampled and recorded at 5 second intervals. The two-minute means of fluxes and meteorology are reported.

User's Guide:Open Data User's Guide

Data Files: Download Data File (one *.zip file with 3 *.nc files)


Vegetation Inventory of Oak-Hickory Forest at Missouri Ozark (MOFLUX) Site: 2004-2017

Vegetation inventory observations have been taken during years 2004 through 2017 at the second-growth upland oak-hickory forest at the Missouri Ozark AmeriFlux (MOFLUX) site. The MOFLUX site is located in the University of Missouri Baskett Wildlife Research area (BWREA), situated in the Ozark Border Region of central Missouri, USA, and is part of the AmeriFlux network (site ID: US-MOz).

User's Guide:Open Data User's Guide

Data Files: Download Data File (one *.csv file)

Related paper describing predawn leaf water potential measurements: Gu et al., 2015 and Supplemental material

Published paper describing The importance of drought-pathogen interactions in driving oak mortality events in the Ozark Border Region: Wood et al., 2018


Predawn Leaf Water Potential of Oak-Hickory Forest at Missouri Ozark (MOFLUX) Site: 2004-2020

Measurements of predawn leaf water potential (PLWP) have been made at weekly to biweekly intervals during the 2004 to 2020 growing seasons of the second-growth upland oak-hickory forests at the Missouri Ozark AmeriFlux (MOFLUX) site. The MOFLUX site is located in the University of Missouri Baskett Wildlife Research area (BWREA), situated in the Ozark Border Region of central Missouri, USA.

User's Guide: Open Data User's Guide

Data Files: Download Data File (one *.csv file)

Published paper describing predawn leaf water potential measurements: Gu et al., 2015 and Supplemental material


Flux Measurements at the Missouri Ozark Flux (MOFLUX)

The MOFLUX site is part of the AmeriFlux network and site characteristic and data are available from the AmeriFlux web site (https://ameriflux.lbl.gov/). The MOFLUX data acquisition systems include EC instrumentation, meteorological and radiation sensors, vertical profiles of CO2, H2O, temperature and humidity, soil respiration systems, minirhizontron observations, and vertical profiles of soil temperature and water content.

Access MOFLUX Measurement Data


Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilization.

A new publication by: Ying Sun(a), Lianhong Gu(b,1), Robert E. Dickinson(a,1), Richard J. Norby(b), Stephen G. Pallardy(c), and Forrest M. Hoffman(d) (a)Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712; (b)Environmental Sciences Division and Climate Change Science Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (c)Department of Forestry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211; and (d)Climate Change Science Institute and Computational Earth Sciences Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Citation: Ying Sun, Lianhong Gu, Robert E. Dickinson, Richard J. Norby, Stephen G. Pallardy, and Forrest M. Hoffman. Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilization. PNAS 2014 ; published ahead of print October 13, 2014, doi:10.1073/pnas.1418075111 Abstract: In C3 plants, CO2 concentrations drop considerably along mesophyll diffusion pathways from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts where CO2 assimilation occurs. Global carbon cycle models have not explicitly represented this internal drawdown and therefore overestimate CO2 available for carboxylation and underestimate photosynthetic responsiveness to atmospheric CO2. An explicit consideration of mesophyll diffusion increases the modeled cumulative CO2 fertilization effect (CFE) for global gross primary production (GPP) from 915 to 1,057 PgC for the period of 1901–2010. This increase represents a 16% correction, which is large enough to explain the persistent overestimation of growth rates of historical atmospheric CO2 by Earth system models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 PgC/y/ppm. This finding implies that the contemporary terrestrial biosphere is more CO2 limited than previously thought.

Tool for Evaluating Mesophyll Impact on Predicting Photosynthesis (TEMIPP)

TEMIPP is a Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet-based tool used for demonstrating the impact of lacking an explicit representation of mesophyll diffusion in a photosynthetic model on the predicted response of photosynthesis to the increase in CO2 partial pressures. Download TEMIPP | Download TEMIPP Instructions

LeafWeb is a TES SFA-funded web-based tool for the automated numerical analyses of leaf gas exchange measurements. LeafWeb is a SErvice-in-Exchange-for-Data-Sharing (SEEDS) Project. With the approval of the user, the data LeafWeb receives are preserved and added to a global database of biochemical, physiological, and biophysical properties of single leaves to support studies of plant functions and terrestrial carbon cycle modeling.

Access LeafWeb at http://leafweb.ornl.gov/.

PiTS-1: Carbon Partitioning in Loblolly Pine after 13C Labeling and Shade Treatments

This data set reports the results of the Partitioning in Trees and Soil (PiTS-1) field investigation that examined how carbon partitioning in a stand of loblolly pine trees varied with short-term changes in gross primary production (GPP) due to shading. These measurements were made over range of June 2010 through May 2011 with most samples and measurements collected from July to September 2010 near the 13CO2 labeling event. There are 19 comma-separated ASCII data files provided with this data set.

Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions

Each year estimates of carbon releases from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production are generated. Emissions from fossil-fuel burning represent the largest anthropogenic source of carbon to the atmosphere and are an important contributor to elevated atmospheric CO2 levels. Annual fossil-fuel CO2 emission time series are prepared at global and national scales and these time series serve as building blocks for other data products including gridded (1 x 1) emission time series. Details regarding the methods used to produce these time series and data products may be found on the CDIAC website.

Access Emission Data and Documentation

Boden, T.A., G. Marland, and R.J. Andres. 2013. Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge, Tenn., U.S.A. doi 10.3334/CDIAC/00001_V2013

Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Changing Environments (SPRUCE)

Access publicly available SPRUCE Data and Documentation